ClimateGate news

Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Global cooling

Ahhh, 2008 - the year we prove the climate alarmists wrong, wrong, wrong.


From Michael Asher's blog at Daily Tech:

Over the past year, anecdotal evidence for a cooling planet has exploded. China has its coldest winter in 100 years. Baghdad sees its first snow in all recorded history. North America has the most snowcover in 50 years, with places like Wisconsin the highest since record-keeping began. Record levels of Antarctic sea ice, record cold in Minnesota, Texas, Florida, Mexico, Australia, Iran, Greece, South Africa, Greenland, Argentina, Chile -- the list goes on and on.

No more than anecdotal evidence, to be sure. But now, that evidence has been supplanted by hard scientific fact. All four major global temperature tracking outlets (Hadley, NASA's GISS, UAH, RSS) have released updated data. All show that over the past year, global temperatures have dropped precipitously.

Meteorologist Anthony Watts compiled the results of all the sources. The total amount of cooling ranges from 0.65C up to 0.75C -- a value large enough to erase nearly all the global warming recorded over the past 100 years. All in one year time. For all sources, it's the single fastest temperature change every recorded, either up or down.

Scientists quoted in a past DailyTech article link the cooling to reduced solar activity which they claim is a much larger driver of climate change than man-made greenhouse gases. The dramatic cooling seen in just 12 months time seems to bear that out. While the data doesn't itself disprove that carbon dioxide is acting to warm the planet, it does demonstrate clearly that more powerful factors are now cooling it.

Let's hope those factors stop fast. Cold is more damaging than heat. The mean temperature of the planet is about 54 degrees. Humans -- and most of the crops and animals we depend on -- prefer a temperature closer to 70.

Historically, the warm periods such as the Medieval Climate Optimum were beneficial for civilization. Corresponding cooling events such as the Little Ice Age, though, were uniformly bad news.

Emphasis added.

h/t: Drudge.

Update: Snow cover over North America and much of Siberia, Mongolia and China is greater than at any time since 1966.

Woof.

3 comments:

Halfwise said...

But what pretext would they use to stop industrial development, if they couldn't use Global Warming.

I tell ya, this news of yours is going to be inconvenient for a lot of busybodies.

Halfwise said...

OK, I thought about it for a day and I figured it out.

If the planet is cooling, THAT's our fault too.

We must promptly stop living in the developed world. We will ruin everything.

Simon said...

Doctor Kenneth Tapping miss quoted:
http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2008/02/15/100/?nc=1

Over the past week many, many e-mails arrived from readers with a link to an article in a daily business publication claiming that we are on the verge of another Maunder Minimum, a decades-long period of little or no sunspot activity that occurred roughly between the years 1640-1710. The article appeared with no byline, quoting Dr Kenneth Tapping of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics in Penticton, British Columbia; this is the observatory that supplies our daily solar flux values. But I thought the quotes sounded a little strange and not like Ken. Some readers also felt this way. As one wrote, "The article didn't quite ring true," and "I have a fairly broad scientific reading list."

I sent Ken an e-mail. He responded that this has been a difficult week for him. A few weeks ago he received a phone call from a woman who engaged him in "a long discussion involving possibilities ranging from likely to not likely." He wrote that the article promotes something that is untrue, and "in no way do I support the conclusions she assigned to me."

I think we can relax about any possible upcoming 70-year period of a quiet Sun. We cannot say that it could not happen, but in fact there is nothing unusual about the current Solar Cycle minimum, and really no known method of predicting such a period.